Tech Analysis of Technical Fabrics: Bamboo, Merino, Synthetic

Hey guys what’s up doing something a little bit different on the channel today I’ve been investigating some new hot weather or workout active working on the car type gear I have been using synthetic stuff for a while and it works great because it dries quickly it’s easy to take care of however I just can’t stand the stink anymore they for some reason these fabrics just hold the smell even after you wash it and I’ve used baking soda of your salt I’ve used specialty detergents and nothing really seems to affect it that much I think it’s just the way that the material is designed it traps bacteria it’s hard to get the bacteria out and it just never really truly gets clean so maybe about a month ago I’d purchased a bamboo shirt which is what you see on the left there and it’s been pretty good however somebody turned me on to the fact that merino wool is actually a very good summer material as well I’m used to using that for base layers and socks for skiing but so I figured I’d give it a shot so I tried to look up some reviews online and they get a lot of mixed things about you know what’s better merino or bamboo what dries faster the pros and cons of each some say bamboo dries faster some say merino dries faster so today we’re gonna do a little experiment and see we’ll see what happens we’re gonna throw all these in the washing machine put it through a cycle and then we’re gonna hang dry it here and do a little elapsed time photography on it and see which one dries faster and then see if we can come to some conclusions about which material is the best so let’s get to it okay an attempt to make this somewhat scientific I’m going to start out by weighing all these shirts they’re all mediums but the fabric weight is a little bit different on all of them I can tell that some of them have a little bit more heft than the other I don’t know the exact specs on all these fabrics I know the merino I think is an ultra light fabric that 150 grams the other two they synthetic here and the bamboo here I’m not sure what those are so just think you kind of get a baseline and go ahead and just weigh them to see if the weight comes into play with drying time so we’re gonna go with synthetic first that’s at 143 to go with the merino next 131 the bamboo one is gonna be last get it on there at a hundred and fifty six so under fifty seven somewhere around there so it looks like definitely the bamboo cotton blend is the heavyweight out of the three all right while these things were in the washer I was trying to figure out a good way of measuring how fast these garments are drying and when I decided on is that I have a measurement from when the garments were dry before they went in the washer and that the best thing to do would be to weigh them at intervals I’m gonna go every like maybe 10 or 20 minutes and we’ll know when they’re dry when they weigh the same amount as they did when we started and then we can take a look at how much weight they gained how fast they’re losing water and and ultimately which one dries the quickest so these I’m gonna do the initial weighing after coming out of the washer I’ve got my scale it’s all zeroed out this is the synthetic shirt get it all in the bowl there and at 245 grams write that down next we’re gonna go to the arena shirt at 229 grams wet so it’s two hundred and twenty nine grams wet and the last is the Intel that this one is gonna be the heaviest the bamboo one it doesn’t feel great right now it’s very wet and very damp like a towel three hundred and sixty grams so weighing quite absorbing quite a bit more water than the rest of them all right so I’m gonna hang these guys up and come back in ten minutes and see where we’re at all right it’s been about ten minutes since these left the washer I just want to show you how I am hanging them up to dry it’s about 79 degrees in here I do have the air conditioning on there’s no fans or any of the vents blowing directly at it so that’s it’s time to go for a way in okay we got the set up here to apologize I lost some of the Sun lighting in here so things are gonna be a little bit darker go with the synthetic first we were ten minutes ago we were at 2:45 we’re at 2:30 for now I’d go with the merino which we were at 229 before 218 now and then going with the bamboo which is still really heavy and wet it just feels like a cotton t-shirt it doesn’t feel that great but it could be because it weighs more so we’ll see yeah three you were at 33 60 out of the washer and we are at 345 right now now for everybody’s favorite moment and the really what makes a great YouTube video is Excel spreadsheets so this is the compilation of all of the data that I took measuring the garments every or almost every 10 minutes while they were drying so this first box up here is the garment weight in grams and this is the this column B is the starting or the dry weight and then we have time here is 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 minutes and then the weight of the actual garment at each point in time so zero is the time that when we may measure it out of the washer and we went all the way up to one hundred and thirty minutes at 10-minute intervals and then I had to go out and I came back about three hours later and I took another measurement so and then below that we have the amount of water loss or gain each fabric took and that’s just the the measure that’s just the difference between you know so s starting throughs though is the amount of water it gained so we did – 45 – 146 that gives you 99 straight across so positive numbers gain negative number is how much it’s losing so what’s interesting here is that the the bamboo shirt was actually at dry it was heavier than some of the other fabrics as I thought I don’t know think though that like I said I don’t have the exact specs on it but right here we’re looking at it’s about 18 percent heavier than the merino and it’s about five percent heavier than synthetic but what’s interesting is that out of the washer it’s it held almost a hundred and eight percent more water than the other two fabrics so it’s only five or eighteen percent heavier of a fabric but it had absorbed a hundred percent more water so coming out of the washer you see the synthetic gained ninety nine grams the merino gained ninety nine grams the bamboo gained almost twice that at two hundred and six grams so right there it’s it’s holding on to a lot more water but then as you look at some of these numbers here you can see that you know they’re all kind of going down as as the garment dries and right around here around ONP this is when the merino is actually starting to dry out a little bit or I would consider dry because I got two consecutive measurements that are the same so it’s not losing a whole lot more water and then you can see the difference from one hundred and thirty minutes to three hundred and ten minutes is only two grams whereas you know the bamboo is still drying because it went from 206 down to 166 grams in those three hours that I was away and but the interesting thing here is that if you look at the gain and loss of water is that the bamboo actually seems to be losing water faster at a faster rate than the merino or the synthetic garment so it’s actually drying faster however it absorbed more water and just to kind of put that graphically I made this little chart here the gray line is the bamboo shirt the blue line is the synthetic shirt and the merino line is this orange so you can see that the merino and the synthetic are drying at about the same rate their slopes in this equation right here I know is this is the technical part of the analysis their slopes are negative point seven six and negative point seven three so that means that they’re drying at approximately the same rate with a slight edge going to the synthetic fabric however you can see that this gray line even though it starts higher its slope is more negative than these two which means it is losing water faster however you look over here and this is the time to drive versus the weight so the synthetic is is you know point eight nine minutes per gram of fabric the merino is 0.92 minutes per gram of fabric the bamboo is at a whopping two minutes per gram of fabric so you might say well wait a minute these two things are kind of you know contradictory one he over here you’re saying that it’s drawing faster than the other two it’s losing water quicker however over here you’re saying that it takes two minutes per gram of fabric and so what I’m attributing that to is the fact that while the bamboo does lose water faster it also absorbed more water in the beginning as we can see here you know two took on like I said almost twice as much water as the the other two fabrics so what does this all kind of boil down to my takeaway from this is that it kind of depends on how you’re going to use the shirt if you’re using all of these shirts as a workout shirt where you’re not getting it super drenched and you’re not going to be out in the rain or someplace like that then I think bamboo is a good option because it dries as quick if not quicker than a merino or a synthetic shirt however if you’re going camping or you’re going someplace where you you need to either wash the clothes and you want to dry it quickly and you don’t have access to a dryer or you’re going someplace where you’re gonna get rained on and just thoroughly soaked through or if you’re going canoeing or kayaking or something and like you fall in and you need your clothes to dry fast bamboo is definitely not a great choice because it holds on to more water when it does get wet then the merino or their synthetic and I mean there’s a couple of other things to consider too is that merino you can apparently wear for like a week straight without it’s developing any smell synthetic well we know it’s it’s a good fabric and it doesn’t absorb a lot of water and it sheds the water pretty quickly like I said before I just can’t take the stink of it bamboo is somewhere in the middle where you can’t wear it as long as the merino you can probably get a couple of days out of it and then it’ll start to smell from this from what I’ve read however you know then you have to factor price until all this as well so the synthetic is relatively inexpensive the merino is very expensive about twice the cost of a bamboo shirt and the bamboo as I said before somewhere in the middle so I hope this kind of helps you I don’t have a definitive answer the answer is unfortunately it depends on which you want to use the garment for but these are my takeaways for and I hope it helps you and making a decision on what fabric is best for you well that does it for this video if you liked what you saw don’t forget to give it a thumbs up and leave a comment if you have any questions or if you have any suggestions about other tests you want to see done on these fabrics just also leave those in the comment and if you know anybody friends family anybody who is struggling with you know what kind of fabric that is suitable for them don’t forget to share this video with them as well so thanks for watching and have a great day you

Can You Guess Bed Sheet Thread Count?

– I mostly sleep naked but I don’t think we can do that on camera. (upbeat funk music) – Alright, let’s get in bed. – Well these are a little rough. – And these are a little newspapery. – I’m not really satisfied with this, it’s kind of itchy. If I have a slumber party, the person I like least would probably get these sheets. (chuckles) – I’m not a fan of these. I think these are like the 150 or whatever.

– These sheets are like a cape for Halloween. – Probably like 250. – Oh 250, that’s very specific. I’d just go with 200. – 300 thread count. – 200. – Well 200 is right but oops I didn’t realize cotton felt like this. – You win. Alright what do we got here? Ooo! – This is significantly better. – I like it. – Ooo these are better. Now I understand. – These are quite nice. – I can have sex in these sheets. – Yes. (laughs) – These are more bangable. – See to me, all sheets are bangable unless it’s a plastic tarp. – I prefer sheets with dark colors. – Yes for periods. – I like touching myself. – I’m gonna get out of bed now. – These are not Netflix and Chill sheets these are like, Sunday morning breakfast in bed, I love you sheets. You know? – I think the thread count is probably, I’m gonna guess 400. – I say 500. – These are 700. Fo sho. – Oh bloody hell we know nothing. – Killin it! – I’m so close! – Well I’m just gonna fart in here. – These seem like an executive would own these. – These are like the not classy 1% though.

This is like the Donald Trump of sheets. – They’re really thick. – Yeah. This feels like an army uniform. – Yeah I’m not a big fan of this. – Also yeah the color throws me off. I wouldn’t really want to bang in these sheets. – I like this color. – So sex rating, low. – I’m gonna say 850. – I would say 400. – Shit I don’t know, 1000? I win! – 1000 thread count. – What! The higher the thread count, the better though.

Or is it sometimes it’ll suddenly drop off and be shit again? (grunts) – Ooo! – Yes! – Yeah were getting into cotton territory. 6- It reminds me of a super hero in the night. – Jesus Christ. – Ok they’re very thin but they’re very soft. – Wiggle your toes. – This just feels very elegant and flowy. – Sex rating? – This is not, this is like a 10. – I would feel bad about banging in these risking not feeling this again. – I don’t know like 3000. – You’re gonna say 3000? I wanna say 1,200. 1800 thread count. If it’s good enough to clean camera lens, it’s good enough to rub on my body.

– I thought you were gonna say butt. – Or my butt. – I think there’s a clear winner. – Yeah. – Microfiber. – Microfiber for the win. – Shockingly enough, microfiber was the upset. It’s a cheaper sheet but yet far superior. – Definitely softer. – Yes these are my favorite. – I love that microfilm. – Microfiber. – I love that microfiber. I love it. .