DIY Plywood – Cali Bamboo Profiles 3 MakerPlace Woodworkers

It comes as no surprise that Cali Bamboo’s plywood is ideal for creating basically any product that is traditionally made out of wood. Now recently, we’ve learned that several of our bamboo plywood customers make their creations at somewhere called Maker Place. Which lead us to wonder what is Maker Place? Maker Place operates pretty much like a 24 Hour Fitness or your typical gym model where it’s a membership a monthly membership. We also have yearly memberships.

We started this back in December of last year just as a place where people have a workshop and have access to big tools that they normally wouldn’t have access to. Otherwise, the overhead cost to get these things developed would be too much and people would never be able to see it through. Hi, I’m Alex, the creator of the bamboo lunch box. It’s a project me and my friend came up because of our love of sustainability and lunch. Everybody has great memories of lunch and recess in school and they always remember their lunch box. And everybody had cool characters and good memories of it, so we kinda took the Japanese style Bento box and American style lunch box. Mashed it together and we’re hopefully coming out with awesome different creations with limited edition art series at bamboolunchbox.com. My name’s Mike Lucero. I developed the Backsedator about twelve years ago, thirteen years ago. And what it is is an acupressure board, that’s basically a natural pain reliever, muscle relaxer and muscle balancer all in one. This is the AccuHook, and what it really is is the back board hits up to a certain point.

The AccuHook works from that point on, so it’s really designed to work from your cervical region, ok up your spine, up to the base of your skull. And then back out from your trapezius, back on up through the cervical region of the neck. So it goes off the same thing Meridian Line therapy and pressure point application. This is what we call The Cash Box. It’s a bamboo ipowered point of sale built with all natural materials and earth friendly bamboo, earth friendly leather. It uses the iPad. It’s got a thermal printer built into it. It’s got a cash drawer built into it. And it’s got this really nifty mechanism where the cashier can ring up the order, swipe the customer’s credit card, send the iPad over to the customer, the screen rotates around, they use their finger to sign. We discovered Cali Bamboo and it kind of opened our eyes to a whole other world. And with these bamboo plywoods we can treat this bamboo as if it was regular old plywood, and cut it and stain it and oil it, and do whatever we were going to do to wood to this bamboo.

And you get these really amazing lustrous finishes. It’s unique, it’s different, and it allows you to market the product on the whole eco side of the world. At Maker Place I have access to all kinds of equipment that I wouldn’t normally have, and allows me to do really cool creative stuff that I would only be able to dream of without Maker Place.

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How to make a plywood Tatami Bed

Welcome back! Today I’m going to make a Japanese-style bed. These beds are lower than western ones, with the mattress embedded in a wooden frame. I’ve tried to come up with a design that would be easy to make using plywood, although other kinds of wooden sheets could also be used. Besides, this design is easy to assemble and disassemble, quite convenient if we want to move. I’ve designed two types of bed. This one is meant to be adapted to a common metal bed frame which you can find in any store. As you can see, the bed frame rests on these four corners which, in turn, join all the pieces. The other bed design is of the same size. However, for this design we’ll use a homemade plywood frame. In this video I’ll show you how I made the first of the two models, although both beds have similar makes.

By changing the length of some pieces we can adapt this design to any bed size. Now let’s take a look at how I made it. This time around, in order to save time I’ve ordered some pre-cut pieces from the same warehouse where I bought the board, since the parts are quite large. I’ll start by cutting these pieces at an angle. They’ll be used to make the headboard thicker. I’ll also machine this rebate to work around the floor plinth. I’ll also glue these pieces together, onto which I will later screw the bed side rails. Now I glue the three upper side rails together to make them thicker. I machine these pieces like this and put them in place with glue.

I sand these parts now that it’s easier and screw the bed side rails in like this. Now I can start assembling the bed. I cut these two pieces in half to make four supports for the bed frame. First I screw this one onto the side rails, keeping it 1mm away from the edge. I remove the piece and then screw it onto the headboard. This way, when screwing it back on, the screws will put pressure and the joint between the side rail and the headboard will be tighter. I’ll use the same system for the back. I’ve numbered all the corners to make future assemblies easier. With these last screws I finish putting the bed together. Now it’s time to set up the nightstands. I glue these parts together and add a little salt to stop them from moving due to the glue’s viscosity. Once the glue is dry, I sand the inner part now that it’s easier and continue assembling the nightstands.

I finish sanding all the pieces that make up the bed and apply three coats of satin water-based varnish. I’m going to put everything back together at the workshop to see what the finished bed looks like. I love how the edge of the plywood looks. Of course, we could apply some dye to change the color, but I like the natural look of birch wood. .

33 – How To Edgeband Plywood

Marc: Plywood is an excellent material for building furniture. But it suffers from one major flaw, ugly edges. (rock music) Despite what some may think, plywood is not a four letter word. Actually it’s more like seven letters and you definitely should not be afraid to use it in your projects. Some of my favorite pieces contain plywood. The panels of this amoire, the doors of this jewelry box, the top of this hall table, and this entire desk system. Yep, all plywood. Plywood is flat, it’s stable, and it comes in lots of varieties. And you could even use plywood as a base for your favorite exotic veneers. Now, descent plywood should run you at least $40 a sheet, but even the most expensive plywood presents the same old challenge. How do you treat the edges? Now the most common solution is edge banding. Edge banding comes in a number of varieties including; thin veneer, thin home sawn veneer, and then a more substantial solid wood strip.

The thin veneer edge banding usually comes in rolls like this and it can be purchased plain or in the iron-on variety. Now personally I prefer a good quality iron-on banding. By good quality, I mean a nice, clean face and a good chunky layer of glue on the other side. Now, I usually pick this material up at my local hardwood dealer. So why not use the regular stuff, without the pre-applied glue? Well, I find it difficult to get the proper clamping pressure across the edge and it’s a lot messier.

It also takes a lot longer to dry, so pre-glued is the only way to go in my shop. Now, it’s no secret that veneer edge banding gets a pretty bad rap. Most people see this stuff and immediately think that it’s gonna peel off or just become a problem down the road and that’s not necessarily true if you use the right material and you apply it correctly. Let me show you how. Here are the basic tools you’ll need for the job. Nothing really fancy. Start by bringing the iron up to temperature. I like it just shy of the hottest setting. Next, I cut a strip of edge banding just a bit over sized. Now with the work piece in a vertical position, I begin heating up the first 5″-6″ of the veneer. And keep the iron moving in order to avoid burning. Also notice how I occasionally tilt the iron on an angle to ensure good contact between the glue and the edge of the plywood. Once the glue is melted, go over the area with a roller to ensure full and complete contact.

This is really the step that makes a difference between a quality edge banding job and a crappy one. I then repeat the entire process on the remainder of the edge banding and this is a system that I use whether the piece is 1′ long or 6′ long. And here’s a little tip for you. Try to keep the bulk of the material to one side of the ply. This makes life a whole lot easier when it comes time to flush the veneer to the surface. Trimming the ends is fairly easy. With the veneer face down, simply scribe the edge with a utility knife and snap the piece off. I have two methods of removing the bulk of the overhang. The first is with a utility knife.

Simple and effective, but it can be difficult if you’re working on an assembled case or odd shaped parts. The second method is to use a simple block plane. After a few swipes the edging will be flush with the surface. Just take care not to gauge your ply. It’s very easy to do and it looks terrible. (scraping) The final step is 180 grit sanding. This will remove any excess glue and smooth out the edge. When it’s all said and done, you should be left with a seamless transition between the face and the edging. (funky music) So what do we do in a case like this? You’re gonna confront this a lot in standard case work. We’ve got a fitted piece in the middle here between two other pieces.

I’ll show you how that’s done. Once again, I cut an over sized strip of edge banding. The first order of business is to square up one edge. This is easy enough to do using a scrap piece of plywood, a square, and a utility knife. Just watch your fingers and lightly score the veneer before breaking it off. I place the square end of my new strip against the adjoining piece and apply some heat.

I’m really only focused on the first few inches here. Notice that I only roll toward the joint. Rolling away will cause the piece to move and result in a gap. Now that the first few inches are secure, I heat up the rest of the strip. Be sure not to glue down the last few inches. Using a square, I score the loose end of the strip so that it’s just slightly over sized and by slightly, I mean no more than about 1/64th of an inch. Now I lift up the loose end and bend the tip down so it pushes against the adjoining piece.

I then apply heat and pressure. That little bit of extra material is what gives us a perfect joint. (funky music) Now if you want to step up the quality and you want something that’s a bit more durable than veneer, you could always use these home sawn strips. Now I usually cut mine to about 1/8″ thick and about 3/4″ wide. And since most plywood is just under 3/4″, this gives me that little bit of extra material I need to ensure perfect coverage. I have two ways I like to attach thin home sawn strips.

The first is simply glue and clamps. I apply glue to both the strip and the ply. Now here’s a little tip for you. If you use scrap pieces of veneer to prop the piece of ply up, the strip will be roughly centered on the edge. I then use a small strip of alder as a call, which will distribute the clamping pressure across the surface. The second technique is about as low tech as it gets. I just use strips of tape as little clamps that secure the strip until the glue dries. Obviously this is not ideal in terms of clamping pressure, but this trick may get you out of a bind sometime. Once the glue is dry I use a flush trim saw to carefully trim off the excess material. (sawing) To flush up the edging, I start with a block plane to remove the bulk. (scraping) I follow up with a card scraper in order to avoid gauging the ply and finally, a light 180 grit sanding. The final option is to use a more substantial piece of solid edge banding.

This technique is great if you need a really durable edge or if you want to be able to route a profile into it. You can’t really do that with these thin strips. Once again, I have two techniques. The first of which is the standard glue and clamps. The second method I use is for when you’re in a bit of a rush. I use 1/4″ brad nails and glue. Before shooting the brad nails, I place a small piece of tape over each spot that I plan on driving a nail through. Now I’m not a huge fan of this method because nails don’t apply consistent pressure across the surface like clams and calls, but in some situations this may be the only option and since we’re making holes, we need to repair holes and that’s why I put the tape down first.

The tape ensures that the filler goes in the hole only and not in the surrounding grain. Now flushing the edging is the same routine. You start with the block plane, move to the card scraper, and then a little bit of sanding. (funky music) Now you want to have a little bit more fun with your edges? Here’s one of my favorite tricks. If you take a thin strip of one species and glue that on first, then glue on top of that, another species, you get the look of a fine perimeter inlay.

The doors on this jewelry box were done this way, as were the tops of our office desks. Fine furniture can mean different things to different people. While I probably wouldn’t use iron-on edge banding for my ‘fine furniture’, I wouldn’t hesitate to use solid wood edge banding, but you know, that’s just my opinion. And although I try to use solid wood in all of my projects, there are just times when plywood makes the most structural and economic sense. So as you can see, if treated properly, plywood can truly be a beautiful thing. Thanks for watching. (soft banjo music) .

Kerf Bending Plywood – DIY Ottoman Table Build

The problem: Ottomans take up space, no room for coffee table. Ripping 16″ section off birch plywood panel. Marking the center to find where the corners will be. Seven kerfs spaced 1/4″ apart. Raising blade to leave just 1/8″ of material. Scariest part! Running the plywood to cut the kerf. Phew! Cutting the rest of the kerfs. Test bend. Set depth of circular saw to almost bite through. Plunge cut. These create space for hidden splines. Test bend. Scrap hardwood ripped to fit in the circular saw kerf. Cutting out splines. Ready for the glue up! Apply a lot of glue! Clamp and check for square. Insert splines and let dry for a few days. Old desk leg, apply adhesive and sandpaper. Perfect for cleaning up the inside curves. Fill any left over voids. Sand smooth. Not bad! Placing together leaves a void.

Let’s fix it! Marking so it will be flush with the flat surfaces. Cut out on the bandsaw. Round edges on disc sander. Creating the center strip. Setting blade to cut 15° Slicing one side. Flip and slice other side. I went as far as needed, killed the table saw and took out the piece rather than run it entirely through unsafely. That’ll do. Marking out the profile for a lap joint. Cutting out on the bandsaw. Gluing in place. Apply polyurethane. Line inside with a slippery material. Trim flush with razor blade. It fits! This one fits too! Move two together to add the flush insert. Glamor shots. .