Pros & Cons of Common Fabrics | Fibres & Fabrics Part 1

Hey guys, welcome to my fibres and fabrics series. In this video, part one, I’ll be talking about some common materials that you likely have or will come across. And what the pros and cons are for both everyday use and the environmental impact. Part two will be about vegan synthetic versus animal materials. And part 3 will be all about upcycled and recycled materials. So definitely check those out as well. So first up is cotton, and I’ll include time codes below for the different materials if you want to jump ahead or reference certain ones. Cotton is probably the most common fabric and it’s a natural fibre, it comes from the cotton plant And it is: soft, breathable (meaning that air can move through it and moisture can evaporate through it), easy to clean (it’s machine washable), absorbent, versatile ( there’s tons of different kinds of cotton materials and garments), it’s good for people with allergies or skin sensitivities The cons are that it doesn’t hold dye really well so it fades overtime and can also bleed while being washed. It wrinkles, it can shrink in hot water, especially the first time it’s washed. The environmental pros are that it is biodegradable.

And the environmental cons are that it needs a lot of water to grow. It’s also usually bleached and chemically treated and dyed. Cotton also has one of the highest pesticide uses for crops. And it’s generally GMO as well. But these two things are prevented by purchasing organic cotton. Next is Linen, and it’s another natural material It comes from the flax plant and it was used all the way back in ancient Egypt. And linen as a fibre is: breathable, durable, lightweight, absorbent, it’s generally very cool and good for summer time, I also read that it’s antimicrobial but I wasn’t able to find very much in-depth information to back that up The cons are that is wrinkles easily It often requires gentler or hand washing and sometimes there is fake linen or ‘linen look’ material so you have to be careful of that. The environmental pros are that it requires little pesticides and water to grow, especially compared to cotton. And it is biodegradable.

And the cons are that it can sometimes be dyed with toxic chemicals but it depends on how it’s made. Another plant fibre is hemp. And it comes from the cannabis plant but a type that’s only used for hemp production. And as a fibre it is: durable, absorbent, it becomes softer with wear and washing, it’s breathable and it can also be hypoallergenic. The cons are that it can sometimes be rough, it wrinkles and different countries sometimes have very strict laws around growing and processing hemp. So there are difficulties around that with hemp fabric production. The environmental pros are that it doesn’t require pesticides or lots of water to grow, It doesn’t deplete nutrients from the soils so it’s a really good crop. It is biodegradable and because it’s very durable the garments usually last long And for environmental cons, I really couldn’t find anything. It’s basically seen as being the most eco-friendly material.

Then there’s polyester, which is likely the most common synthetic fibre. It’s made from petrochemicals and is: wrinkle resistant, durable, it dries quickly it’s colourfast, it’s machine washable it tends to retain it’s shape well and it’s cheap. The cons are that it doesn’t breathe which can also cause it to become smelly, it builds up static and it can also irritate the skin. An environmental pro is that it can be recycled but this does require another chemical process. And the environmental cons are that it doesn’t biodegrade, fibres come off of it when it’s being washed and those end up polluting the ocean, it’s energy intensive and very polluting to make, toxic chemicals are used to make it and it’s also very difficult to dye which requires a lot of chemicals.

Then we have wool. Wool is a natural protein fibre like your hair. And it mainly comes from sheep but can also come from alpacas, goats and other animals. Wool as a fibre is: very warm (it’s even warm when wet), water resistant, durable, very absorbent, flame resistant and hypoallergenic. The cons are that it shrinks in hot water, it must be hand washed or dry cleaned, it can pill and depending on the kind of wool, it can be itchy or irritating to the skin. The environmental pros are that it’s easily dyed, which usually means there are less harsh chemicals used, it’s biodegradable and because it’s very durable it means that the garment will usually wear really well and can be kept for a long time. The environmental cons are that because it comes from an animal there are issues and concerns around the treatment and care and wellbeing of those animals. And I will talk more about that in part two. Toxic chemicals and pesticides can also be used and this can be avoided by looking for organic wool. Next is acrylic which is a synthetic petrochemical fibre. It was developed to be a man made alternative to wool and it is: lightweight, soft, colourfast, machine washable and cheap.

The cons are that it tends to pill easily it doesn’t breathe, it builds up static. For the environmental pros, I really couldn’t find anything. And the cons are that it doesn’t biodegrade, it’s not easily recycled, there are toxic chemicals used to make it, it’s energy intensive and again fibres wash off of it that end polluting the oceans. Then there’s silk which is a natural protein fibre. It comes from the cocoon of the silk worm. And it is: very soft, it has a natural sheen, it’s lightweight has a good drape, so it generally looks very nice in clothing and it’s often good for very sensitive skin.

The cons are that it’s expensive, it requires hand washing or dry cleaning, it’s not very durable and it’s susceptible to discolouration from sunlight or perspiration. The environmental pros are that it is biodegradable, and it dyes very easily. And the environmental cons are that the silk worms are actually killed in the process of harvesting the silk from the cocoons so it is not at all an ethical or vegan material. Next is nylon another synthetic made from petrochemicals It was developed to be a synthetic replacement for silk. And it is: strong, weather resistant, versatile, water repellent, machine washable, it dries quickly and it’s cheap. The cons are that some types of nylon build up static, it can irritate skin The environmental pros are that it is a pretty durable material so the garment will usually last a long time And for the cons, like with polyester, fibres come off when it’s washed that end up polluting the oceans, toxic chemicals are used to make it, there are a lot of harmful emissions, it’s energy intensive and it’s not biodegradable.

Then there’s spandex, also called elastane or lycra. It’s a very elastic fibre also made from petrochemicals. And it’s usually found blended with other fibres. It is: stretchy, it helps clothes retain their shape, and it can help with fit. The cons are that it breaks down over time, it can also become brittle and yellow. The environmental pros are that it can help make clothes not stretch out and the environmental cons are that it doesn’t biodegrade, it’s energy intensive and polluting to make and toxic chemicals are used. Finally there’s a few naturally derived synthetic fibres. The first I’ll talk about is rayon and it’s primarily made from a wood pulp that goes through a chemical process. And as a fibres it’s: soft, inexpensive, absorbent, anti-static, (unlike other synthetic materials), The cons are that it’s not very durable, it tends to pill, it wrinkles, it loses strength when wet and can easily become misshapen and it also shrinks very easily. I actually couldn’t really find any environment pros for rayon except for the fact that it uses less toxic chemicals than other synthetics but there’s still toxic chemicals, so I still see that as a con.

Because it’s a wood pulp it can contribute to deforestation and it’s energy intensive to make. There’s also bamboo and the majority of bamboo is actually bamboo viscose or a bamboo rayon And countries have different laws about whether or not it has to be labeled as viscose derived from bamboo or a bamboo rayon. But basically it’s the same process as rayon but instead of using wood pulp, they use bamboo. And as a fibre it is soft, breathable, very absorbent, and also doesn’t build up static. The cons are that like rayon, some bamboo fabrics will pill really easily and I like I mentioned different countries will have different rules as how it’s supposed to be labeled so that can be confusing. The environmental pros are that bamboo is very renewable to grow and requires little water and pesticides.

And the cons are that there are still toxic chemicals used to make the material, and it’s energy intensive. And the last fibre I’m going to talk about is lyocell or tencel. And it’s another naturally derived synthetic made from wood pulp. And it is: soft, very absorbent, resistant to wrinkles, versatile, durable, breathable, anti-static and also claims to be hypoallergenic. The cons are that it can pill easily and also sometimes needs special care. The environmental pros are that it is biodegradable, It’s made in a closed loop system so the chemicals are recycled. And it’s much less toxic to produce than other synthetics and natural synthetics like rayon. The cons are that it is still uses quite a bit of energy to produce and because it does come from wood pulp it could also contribute to deforestation but overall it is the most environmentally friendly synthetic material.

So of course there are also other materials than the ones I’ve mentioned and you’ll also likely find a lot of blends. And blends can combine the benefits of both materials but it can also negate some of them. For example, a polyester/cotton blend will mean that the item is no longer biodegradable. As you’ve probably noticed, no material is perfect. And it’s just about trying your best to make informed decisions and also choosing the right materials for the function of the garment. I personally try to stick with natural materials for both comfort and environmental reasons.

But it doesn’t make sense all the time. For example with swimwear, it makes much more sense to have something that doesn’t absorb water and dries quickly. So I hope you’ve found this interesting and maybe learned something. Please let me know in the comments if they are any pros or cons that I missed. Thank you so much for watching and I’ll see you in the next one. .

Pros & Cons of Common Fabrics | Fibres & Fabrics Part 1

Hey guys, welcome to my fibres and fabrics series. In this video, part one, I’ll be talking about some common materials that you likely have or will come across. And what the pros and cons are for both everyday use and the environmental impact. Part two will be about vegan synthetic versus animal materials. And part 3 will be all about upcycled and recycled materials. So definitely check those out as well. So first up is cotton, and I’ll include time codes below for the different materials if you want to jump ahead or reference certain ones. Cotton is probably the most common fabric and it’s a natural fibre, it comes from the cotton plant And it is: soft, breathable (meaning that air can move through it and moisture can evaporate through it), easy to clean (it’s machine washable), absorbent, versatile ( there’s tons of different kinds of cotton materials and garments), it’s good for people with allergies or skin sensitivities The cons are that it doesn’t hold dye really well so it fades overtime and can also bleed while being washed. It wrinkles, it can shrink in hot water, especially the first time it’s washed.

The environmental pros are that it is biodegradable. And the environmental cons are that it needs a lot of water to grow. It’s also usually bleached and chemically treated and dyed. Cotton also has one of the highest pesticide uses for crops. And it’s generally GMO as well. But these two things are prevented by purchasing organic cotton. Next is Linen, and it’s another natural material It comes from the flax plant and it was used all the way back in ancient Egypt. And linen as a fibre is: breathable, durable, lightweight, absorbent, it’s generally very cool and good for summer time, I also read that it’s antimicrobial but I wasn’t able to find very much in-depth information to back that up The cons are that is wrinkles easily It often requires gentler or hand washing and sometimes there is fake linen or ‘linen look’ material so you have to be careful of that.

The environmental pros are that it requires little pesticides and water to grow, especially compared to cotton. And it is biodegradable. And the cons are that it can sometimes be dyed with toxic chemicals but it depends on how it’s made. Another plant fibre is hemp. And it comes from the cannabis plant but a type that’s only used for hemp production. And as a fibre it is: durable, absorbent, it becomes softer with wear and washing, it’s breathable and it can also be hypoallergenic. The cons are that it can sometimes be rough, it wrinkles and different countries sometimes have very strict laws around growing and processing hemp.

So there are difficulties around that with hemp fabric production. The environmental pros are that it doesn’t require pesticides or lots of water to grow, It doesn’t deplete nutrients from the soils so it’s a really good crop. It is biodegradable and because it’s very durable the garments usually last long And for environmental cons, I really couldn’t find anything. It’s basically seen as being the most eco-friendly material. Then there’s polyester, which is likely the most common synthetic fibre. It’s made from petrochemicals and is: wrinkle resistant, durable, it dries quickly it’s colourfast, it’s machine washable it tends to retain it’s shape well and it’s cheap. The cons are that it doesn’t breathe which can also cause it to become smelly, it builds up static and it can also irritate the skin.

An environmental pro is that it can be recycled but this does require another chemical process. And the environmental cons are that it doesn’t biodegrade, fibres come off of it when it’s being washed and those end up polluting the ocean, it’s energy intensive and very polluting to make, toxic chemicals are used to make it and it’s also very difficult to dye which requires a lot of chemicals. Then we have wool. Wool is a natural protein fibre like your hair. And it mainly comes from sheep but can also come from alpacas, goats and other animals.

Wool as a fibre is: very warm (it’s even warm when wet), water resistant, durable, very absorbent, flame resistant and hypoallergenic. The cons are that it shrinks in hot water, it must be hand washed or dry cleaned, it can pill and depending on the kind of wool, it can be itchy or irritating to the skin. The environmental pros are that it’s easily dyed, which usually means there are less harsh chemicals used, it’s biodegradable and because it’s very durable it means that the garment will usually wear really well and can be kept for a long time. The environmental cons are that because it comes from an animal there are issues and concerns around the treatment and care and wellbeing of those animals. And I will talk more about that in part two. Toxic chemicals and pesticides can also be used and this can be avoided by looking for organic wool.

Next is acrylic which is a synthetic petrochemical fibre. It was developed to be a man made alternative to wool and it is: lightweight, soft, colourfast, machine washable and cheap. The cons are that it tends to pill easily it doesn’t breathe, it builds up static. For the environmental pros, I really couldn’t find anything. And the cons are that it doesn’t biodegrade, it’s not easily recycled, there are toxic chemicals used to make it, it’s energy intensive and again fibres wash off of it that end polluting the oceans. Then there’s silk which is a natural protein fibre. It comes from the cocoon of the silk worm. And it is: very soft, it has a natural sheen, it’s lightweight has a good drape, so it generally looks very nice in clothing and it’s often good for very sensitive skin. The cons are that it’s expensive, it requires hand washing or dry cleaning, it’s not very durable and it’s susceptible to discolouration from sunlight or perspiration. The environmental pros are that it is biodegradable, and it dyes very easily. And the environmental cons are that the silk worms are actually killed in the process of harvesting the silk from the cocoons so it is not at all an ethical or vegan material.

Next is nylon another synthetic made from petrochemicals It was developed to be a synthetic replacement for silk. And it is: strong, weather resistant, versatile, water repellent, machine washable, it dries quickly and it’s cheap. The cons are that some types of nylon build up static, it can irritate skin The environmental pros are that it is a pretty durable material so the garment will usually last a long time And for the cons, like with polyester, fibres come off when it’s washed that end up polluting the oceans, toxic chemicals are used to make it, there are a lot of harmful emissions, it’s energy intensive and it’s not biodegradable. Then there’s spandex, also called elastane or lycra. It’s a very elastic fibre also made from petrochemicals. And it’s usually found blended with other fibres. It is: stretchy, it helps clothes retain their shape, and it can help with fit. The cons are that it breaks down over time, it can also become brittle and yellow. The environmental pros are that it can help make clothes not stretch out and the environmental cons are that it doesn’t biodegrade, it’s energy intensive and polluting to make and toxic chemicals are used.

Finally there’s a few naturally derived synthetic fibres. The first I’ll talk about is rayon and it’s primarily made from a wood pulp that goes through a chemical process. And as a fibres it’s: soft, inexpensive, absorbent, anti-static, (unlike other synthetic materials), The cons are that it’s not very durable, it tends to pill, it wrinkles, it loses strength when wet and can easily become misshapen and it also shrinks very easily. I actually couldn’t really find any environment pros for rayon except for the fact that it uses less toxic chemicals than other synthetics but there’s still toxic chemicals, so I still see that as a con. Because it’s a wood pulp it can contribute to deforestation and it’s energy intensive to make. There’s also bamboo and the majority of bamboo is actually bamboo viscose or a bamboo rayon And countries have different laws about whether or not it has to be labeled as viscose derived from bamboo or a bamboo rayon. But basically it’s the same process as rayon but instead of using wood pulp, they use bamboo.

And as a fibre it is soft, breathable, very absorbent, and also doesn’t build up static. The cons are that like rayon, some bamboo fabrics will pill really easily and I like I mentioned different countries will have different rules as how it’s supposed to be labeled so that can be confusing. The environmental pros are that bamboo is very renewable to grow and requires little water and pesticides. And the cons are that there are still toxic chemicals used to make the material, and it’s energy intensive. And the last fibre I’m going to talk about is lyocell or tencel.

And it’s another naturally derived synthetic made from wood pulp. And it is: soft, very absorbent, resistant to wrinkles, versatile, durable, breathable, anti-static and also claims to be hypoallergenic. The cons are that it can pill easily and also sometimes needs special care. The environmental pros are that it is biodegradable, It’s made in a closed loop system so the chemicals are recycled. And it’s much less toxic to produce than other synthetics and natural synthetics like rayon. The cons are that it is still uses quite a bit of energy to produce and because it does come from wood pulp it could also contribute to deforestation but overall it is the most environmentally friendly synthetic material. So of course there are also other materials than the ones I’ve mentioned and you’ll also likely find a lot of blends. And blends can combine the benefits of both materials but it can also negate some of them. For example, a polyester/cotton blend will mean that the item is no longer biodegradable.

As you’ve probably noticed, no material is perfect. And it’s just about trying your best to make informed decisions and also choosing the right materials for the function of the garment. I personally try to stick with natural materials for both comfort and environmental reasons. But it doesn’t make sense all the time. For example with swimwear, it makes much more sense to have something that doesn’t absorb water and dries quickly. So I hope you’ve found this interesting and maybe learned something.

Please let me know in the comments if they are any pros or cons that I missed. Thank you so much for watching and I’ll see you in the next one. .

How to Dye Fabric: Rit All-Purpose Dye

With rit all-purpose Dye you can dye fabrics containing natural fibers like Cotton linen wool or silk and also Rayon and Nylon I’m going to dye samples of a bunch of different fabrics and see what happens. Pre-Wash the fabric to remove any finishes, so the dye will absorb better. Use enough water so the fabric can move around freely The hotter the water the better, so use really hot tap water or heat the water until it’s almost boiling. From here you can use the stove top method where you keep the dye bath on a low simmer throughout which will get the darkest richest colors or you can dye in a container or a stainless steel sink. I’m dyeing the samples in two batches because some of the fabric like salt added and some likes vinegar instead.

Shake the Dye well and add it to the water. as a general guideline for every pound of fabric use half a bottle of liquid dye or one package of powdered dye in three gallons of water To get dark or saturated colors double the amount of dye. I’m using half a cup and each to get a very saturated purple Add salt to the dye bath for Cotton linen and Rayon fabrics or add vinegar for silk wool and Nylon fabrics I’m adding about half a cup of each, but add more for larger projects Stir well Put the wet fabric in the dye bath. In the salt dye bath, I’m putting in bleached and unbleached Muslin 100% Cotton broadcloth and two different poly cotton blends Natural canvas Cotton Jersey Scrim Chintz Irish Linen Rayon Challis Natural burlap white Sultana Burlap and Polyester Gabardine In the Vinegar Dye bath, I’m putting in silk Chiffon silk Organza silk habutae silk Shantung 100% wool felt Rayon Wool Blend felt coated Nylon Oxford fabric Nylon stretch lace Nylon Crystal Organza and Nylon Glitz Sequins Stir continuously for anywhere between 15 minutes to an hour Take it out sooner for lighter colors or leave it in longer for Darker colors Make sure the dye is getting to all parts of the fabric.

So it won’t be splotchy here’s a couple tips for Dyeing: Wear gloves whenever handling the Dye and cover any surfaces that need protection before starting Dryclean only and fabrics that can’t withstand heat shouldn’t be dyed, but if you want to try test out a small piece first Keep in mind that most clothing is made of polyester thread which won’t die with rit all-purpose die Dyeing white fabrics has the best results you can dye other colors, but the original color may affect the outcome You can use rich color remover first to get rid of as much color as possible Remove the fabric from the dye bath when it reaches your desired color keep in mind Fabric looks Darker when wet We suggest using Rit Colorstay fixative before rinsing to increase color retention and reduce bleeding For small projects you can spray the fixative directly on the fabric until saturated or for larger items mix it in a water bath According to the instructions on the bottle.

Let it sit for 20 minutes Rinse the Fabric with warm water, then cooler water until it runs clear And finally hand wash or machine wash with warm water and air dry or tumble dry with an old towel. .

Pros & Cons of Common Fabrics | Fibres & Fabrics Part 1

Hey guys, welcome to my fibres and fabrics series. In this video, part one, I’ll be talking about some common materials that you likely have or will come across. And what the pros and cons are for both everyday use and the environmental impact. Part two will be about vegan synthetic versus animal materials. And part 3 will be all about upcycled and recycled materials. So definitely check those out as well. So first up is cotton, and I’ll include time codes below for the different materials if you want to jump ahead or reference certain ones.

Cotton is probably the most common fabric and it’s a natural fibre, it comes from the cotton plant And it is: soft, breathable (meaning that air can move through it and moisture can evaporate through it), easy to clean (it’s machine washable), absorbent, versatile ( there’s tons of different kinds of cotton materials and garments), it’s good for people with allergies or skin sensitivities The cons are that it doesn’t hold dye really well so it fades overtime and can also bleed while being washed. It wrinkles, it can shrink in hot water, especially the first time it’s washed. The environmental pros are that it is biodegradable. And the environmental cons are that it needs a lot of water to grow. It’s also usually bleached and chemically treated and dyed. Cotton also has one of the highest pesticide uses for crops. And it’s generally GMO as well. But these two things are prevented by purchasing organic cotton.

Next is Linen, and it’s another natural material It comes from the flax plant and it was used all the way back in ancient Egypt. And linen as a fibre is: breathable, durable, lightweight, absorbent, it’s generally very cool and good for summer time, I also read that it’s antimicrobial but I wasn’t able to find very much in-depth information to back that up The cons are that is wrinkles easily It often requires gentler or hand washing and sometimes there is fake linen or ‘linen look’ material so you have to be careful of that. The environmental pros are that it requires little pesticides and water to grow, especially compared to cotton. And it is biodegradable. And the cons are that it can sometimes be dyed with toxic chemicals but it depends on how it’s made. Another plant fibre is hemp. And it comes from the cannabis plant but a type that’s only used for hemp production. And as a fibre it is: durable, absorbent, it becomes softer with wear and washing, it’s breathable and it can also be hypoallergenic.

The cons are that it can sometimes be rough, it wrinkles and different countries sometimes have very strict laws around growing and processing hemp. So there are difficulties around that with hemp fabric production. The environmental pros are that it doesn’t require pesticides or lots of water to grow, It doesn’t deplete nutrients from the soils so it’s a really good crop. It is biodegradable and because it’s very durable the garments usually last long And for environmental cons, I really couldn’t find anything. It’s basically seen as being the most eco-friendly material. Then there’s polyester, which is likely the most common synthetic fibre. It’s made from petrochemicals and is: wrinkle resistant, durable, it dries quickly it’s colourfast, it’s machine washable it tends to retain it’s shape well and it’s cheap. The cons are that it doesn’t breathe which can also cause it to become smelly, it builds up static and it can also irritate the skin. An environmental pro is that it can be recycled but this does require another chemical process. And the environmental cons are that it doesn’t biodegrade, fibres come off of it when it’s being washed and those end up polluting the ocean, it’s energy intensive and very polluting to make, toxic chemicals are used to make it and it’s also very difficult to dye which requires a lot of chemicals.

Then we have wool. Wool is a natural protein fibre like your hair. And it mainly comes from sheep but can also come from alpacas, goats and other animals. Wool as a fibre is: very warm (it’s even warm when wet), water resistant, durable, very absorbent, flame resistant and hypoallergenic. The cons are that it shrinks in hot water, it must be hand washed or dry cleaned, it can pill and depending on the kind of wool, it can be itchy or irritating to the skin. The environmental pros are that it’s easily dyed, which usually means there are less harsh chemicals used, it’s biodegradable and because it’s very durable it means that the garment will usually wear really well and can be kept for a long time. The environmental cons are that because it comes from an animal there are issues and concerns around the treatment and care and wellbeing of those animals. And I will talk more about that in part two. Toxic chemicals and pesticides can also be used and this can be avoided by looking for organic wool.

Next is acrylic which is a synthetic petrochemical fibre. It was developed to be a man made alternative to wool and it is: lightweight, soft, colourfast, machine washable and cheap. The cons are that it tends to pill easily it doesn’t breathe, it builds up static. For the environmental pros, I really couldn’t find anything. And the cons are that it doesn’t biodegrade, it’s not easily recycled, there are toxic chemicals used to make it, it’s energy intensive and again fibres wash off of it that end polluting the oceans. Then there’s silk which is a natural protein fibre. It comes from the cocoon of the silk worm. And it is: very soft, it has a natural sheen, it’s lightweight has a good drape, so it generally looks very nice in clothing and it’s often good for very sensitive skin. The cons are that it’s expensive, it requires hand washing or dry cleaning, it’s not very durable and it’s susceptible to discolouration from sunlight or perspiration.

The environmental pros are that it is biodegradable, and it dyes very easily. And the environmental cons are that the silk worms are actually killed in the process of harvesting the silk from the cocoons so it is not at all an ethical or vegan material. Next is nylon another synthetic made from petrochemicals It was developed to be a synthetic replacement for silk. And it is: strong, weather resistant, versatile, water repellent, machine washable, it dries quickly and it’s cheap. The cons are that some types of nylon build up static, it can irritate skin The environmental pros are that it is a pretty durable material so the garment will usually last a long time And for the cons, like with polyester, fibres come off when it’s washed that end up polluting the oceans, toxic chemicals are used to make it, there are a lot of harmful emissions, it’s energy intensive and it’s not biodegradable.

Then there’s spandex, also called elastane or lycra. It’s a very elastic fibre also made from petrochemicals. And it’s usually found blended with other fibres. It is: stretchy, it helps clothes retain their shape, and it can help with fit. The cons are that it breaks down over time, it can also become brittle and yellow. The environmental pros are that it can help make clothes not stretch out and the environmental cons are that it doesn’t biodegrade, it’s energy intensive and polluting to make and toxic chemicals are used. Finally there’s a few naturally derived synthetic fibres. The first I’ll talk about is rayon and it’s primarily made from a wood pulp that goes through a chemical process. And as a fibres it’s: soft, inexpensive, absorbent, anti-static, (unlike other synthetic materials), The cons are that it’s not very durable, it tends to pill, it wrinkles, it loses strength when wet and can easily become misshapen and it also shrinks very easily. I actually couldn’t really find any environment pros for rayon except for the fact that it uses less toxic chemicals than other synthetics but there’s still toxic chemicals, so I still see that as a con.

Because it’s a wood pulp it can contribute to deforestation and it’s energy intensive to make. There’s also bamboo and the majority of bamboo is actually bamboo viscose or a bamboo rayon And countries have different laws about whether or not it has to be labeled as viscose derived from bamboo or a bamboo rayon. But basically it’s the same process as rayon but instead of using wood pulp, they use bamboo. And as a fibre it is soft, breathable, very absorbent, and also doesn’t build up static. The cons are that like rayon, some bamboo fabrics will pill really easily and I like I mentioned different countries will have different rules as how it’s supposed to be labeled so that can be confusing. The environmental pros are that bamboo is very renewable to grow and requires little water and pesticides. And the cons are that there are still toxic chemicals used to make the material, and it’s energy intensive. And the last fibre I’m going to talk about is lyocell or tencel.

And it’s another naturally derived synthetic made from wood pulp. And it is: soft, very absorbent, resistant to wrinkles, versatile, durable, breathable, anti-static and also claims to be hypoallergenic. The cons are that it can pill easily and also sometimes needs special care. The environmental pros are that it is biodegradable, It’s made in a closed loop system so the chemicals are recycled. And it’s much less toxic to produce than other synthetics and natural synthetics like rayon. The cons are that it is still uses quite a bit of energy to produce and because it does come from wood pulp it could also contribute to deforestation but overall it is the most environmentally friendly synthetic material.

So of course there are also other materials than the ones I’ve mentioned and you’ll also likely find a lot of blends. And blends can combine the benefits of both materials but it can also negate some of them. For example, a polyester/cotton blend will mean that the item is no longer biodegradable. As you’ve probably noticed, no material is perfect. And it’s just about trying your best to make informed decisions and also choosing the right materials for the function of the garment. I personally try to stick with natural materials for both comfort and environmental reasons.

But it doesn’t make sense all the time. For example with swimwear, it makes much more sense to have something that doesn’t absorb water and dries quickly. So I hope you’ve found this interesting and maybe learned something. Please let me know in the comments if they are any pros or cons that I missed. Thank you so much for watching and I’ll see you in the next one. .

Easy DIY Baby Blanket Sewing Tutorial

Hi, I’m Jen from Online Fabric Store. Making a baby blanket is fun because you get to choose prints and colors you like. The blanket I’m going to make is quick and easy. So let’s get started. The materials you’ll need are: 1 yard of minky, I’m using Gray Minky Dot fabric, 1 yard of cotton, I’m using Michael Miller Zoology Sea fabric, fabric scissors, a fabric marker, a ruler, ballpoint pins, and thread. Measure a 36 by 36 inch square out of the cotton and minky fabrics. Make sure you’re measuring on the wrong side of the fabric. Cut out both squares. Place the wrong side of the minky fabric on the table. Center the cotton fabric over the minky with the right side facing up. Fold the edges over 1 inch twice on all four sides and pin. For the corners, snip the extra fabric off at an angle before folding. Stitch with a 1/4 inch seam allowance along the fold line.

Back stitch at the beginning and the end. To keep the corners down, stitch along the outside edge. The baby blanket is now complete. By folding the edges over it gives the blanket a border and creates a finished look. You can use either side of this blanket. Thanks for watching this OFS project. .

Bamboo Rayon Fabrics Intro

Hi guys, Happy Easter! How good is that? I bet you guys will have a lot of chocolate overload this time. So thank you so much for supporting us throughout this month and last month we have launched our pre-Easter sale so that is 15OFF, 15 percent off of roll purchase order. So if you haven’t actually started ordering please you can start ordering now because it’s ending on the 25th of April so only, you can count only a few weeks left and if you have ordered, we thank you so much for this and we would love to give back to you guys to roll out much more sustainable fabric.

So this month we wanted to focus on something that is inter-seasonal so we wanted to launch our bamboo range that is actually good for our Australian customer that is kind of like autumy and good for our European also US customer that is going towards spring and summer. So first of all I wanted to launch two fabrics that I’m gonna do a bit of a comparison. Now we’re gonna have a new product code for this the SNEW code that I’m telling you in a second they’re just only a temporary code. So this is SNEW85 as you can see, let me put it back a little, it’s a little bit shiny, it’s 100%bamboo rayon and is 140gsm whereas this one is less shiny as you can see it’s a bit matte, it’s bamboo rayon as well it’s 150gsm. So this kind of material is so beautiful that you can make a lot of things out of it, you know, you can even consider making this sleepwear or shirt, shirtdress, of you can even make it kind of a top, you know for casual wear that you can really go out to wear it at the same time youknow you can make it into a dress that you can make it into semi casual that go in to work etc.

Beautiful fabric, it’s so soft, this kind of material, if it touch on your skin, it’s got a natural softness and coolness on it. And then the two material that we wanted to launch is this is bamboo rayon fine twill, and this is bamboo twill. I’m gonna make it a bit closer and you can see the fabric has a bit of a shine on it in the yarn and the fabric is actually you can see the light pattern it’s a bit of a diagonal twill, hope you can see it. And this one has a more obvious twill as you can see. So this is SNEW88 and this is SNEW113. This is 230gsm whereas this one is 160 gsm so it goes thicker as we go. so here are the four new bamboo fabric that we would like to launch we will share with you. If you guys have any questions and would like to try and order some samples please feel free to contact our customer support email, so it’s customersupport@vivifytextiles.com if you have nay questions you can as myself my name is Edwina and you can contact me at edwina.huang@vivifytextiles.com.

So I can’t wait to hear from you guys and thank you so much for your support. Have a great Easter, see you guys .